If you thought the vibe between Skip Marley and H.E.R. was magical on their collaborative effort, “Slow Down,” then the visual will only heighten those feelings.

Shot in New York City and directed by Lacey Duke, the visual is an ode to black love, opening in a retro diner when an intrigued Skip catches the eyes of H.E.R. Things heat up when the two take over the dance floor at a feel-good party in an uptown brownstone. In today’s social media-driven culture, it’s delightful to see a spontaneous love connection not triggered by the click of a finger.

“Slow Down” recently peaked at #1 on the Billboard Reggae Digital Sales chart and is Skip’s fastest streaming song to date.

As Jamaican music legend Bob Marley’s 75th birthday celebrations kick-off, Skip carries on as the newest rising star in the family tradition of his grandfather — a foundational icon in the reggae, roots, rock, soul, and hip-hop saga of Island Records.

“I don’t really think about how I want to be perceived by people. They have their own projections. I just want them to see me as a fighter for good. A love warrior,” states the 23-year old Jamaica-born and Florida-based artist.

Skip’s music is a reggae-hybrid that effortlessly blends eras, genres, and styles, while showing off his musicianship and poetic lyricism. His natural talent comes as no surprise – music is quite literally in his blood. Skip’s songs pay homage to the deep and widespread legacy of the Marley family, which includes his uncles, reggae greats Ziggy, Damian and Stephen; and his aunt, singer Marcia Griffiths of the renowned I Three female vocal trio, with Skip’s grandmother Rita Marley.

“I want to spread my music to the people and help them unify,” he says. “I want people to take away a message of love, of looking at the way you are living and thinking where we can work to be or better and feel better. Whatever they’re feeling, I want them to be able to turn up my music and think, relax, and get good vibes.” It’s a radical idea maybe, but an essential one.

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